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UN 'Plan for Post-Gaddafi Libya' Leaked


August 31, 2011
Inside Story / Al Jazeera

A leaked document apparently detailing United Nations preparations for its role in post-Gaddafi Libya reveals plans for the world body to deploy military observers and police officers to the North African country. The head of the NTC is in Europe lobbying for aid that is urgently needed for nation-building and economic recovery.

http://english.aljazeera.net/news/americas/2011/08/20118291127750603.html

UN 'Plan for Post-Gaddafi Libya' Leaked
Al Jazeera

NEW YORK (August 29, 2011) -- A leaked document apparently detailing United Nations preparations for its role in post-Gaddafi Libya reveals plans for the world body to deploy military observers and police officers to the North African country.

The 10-page document, apparently written by a special UN team led by Ian Martin, the former British head of Amnesty International, was obtained and published by Inner City Press, the UN watchdog website.
The document outlines plans for UN-assisted elections in the next six to nine months.

It also calls for the deployment of 200 unarmed military observers and 190 UN police officers to serve as trainers. But it says such a deployment would only be implemented if it was requested by Libyan authorities and authorised by the UN Security Council.

"If requested by the Libyans and authorised by the Council, the UN could contribute to confidence-building and to the implementation of agreed military tasks, through unarmed UN military observer (UNMOs).

"Such confidence-building might be necessary for the troops of the Gaddafi government which will find themselves under the control of hostile forces. The UNMOs might also act as some deterrence against ill treatment of the former enemy by rogue elements."

It also calls for the deployment of 61 civilian staff who will also be stationed in Libya in the first three months, both at a headquarters in Tripoli and at an office in Benghazi.

The UN is pushing for the creation of an interim government ahead of the polls.

"If the stablisation of Tripoli after the collapse of the Gaddafi government becomes such a major challenge that the transitional authorities seek more robust international assistance, this is a task clearly beyond the capacity of the UN," the plan states.

"In this situation, the only viable option to ensure a safe environment in Tripoli are the transitional authorities themselves, with the advice of those who are already assisting or advising them.

"The Security Council's 'protection of civilians' mandate implemented by NATO forces does not end with the fall of the Gaddafi government, and there, NATO would continue to have some responsibilities."

Ban Ki-Moon, the UN Secretary General, has called on the international community to work together to restore order in Libya and for an end to fighting in the country.



Libya's Biggest Hurdle:
As rebels gain further control of the capital Tripoli we ask, what is the biggest challenge facing the country?

Inside Story / Al Jazeera

(August 26, 2011) -- The interim government has moved from Benghazi to Tripoli and is urging the world to release billions of dollars in frozen Libyan assets. The National Transitional Council (NTC) want action, not words. The head of the NTC is in Europe lobbying for aid that is urgently needed for nation-building and economic recovery. But is this the biggest hurdle facing the future of Libya?

Inside Story, with presenter Hazem Sika, discusses with Farhat Bengdara, the former governor of Libya's central bank; Hans Meier-Ewert, the executive vice-president, German Africa Business Association; and Shadi Hamid, the research director at the Brookings Doha Centre.


The Cost of Libya's Revolution
Counting the Cost / Al Jazeera

(August 26, 2011) -- After 42 years, Muammar Gaddafi's rule is considered all but over. But while the fighting goes on, the opposition National Transitional Council (NTC) is taking its first steps to becoming a fully fledged government. To be effective in that role it needs money and if things go well for the NTC, it may just have that, and a whole lot more.

Many people have thrown a lot of money at the uprising in Libya, but now comes the time to find yet more money to rebuild the country and its economy. There is a lot of work to do in getting Libya back on its feet, but the Transitional Council could be in an incredibly strong position: Libya has oil, it has no debts, and it has frozen assets worth between $110 billon and $150 billion.

Counting the Cost can be seen each week at the following times GMT: Friday: 2230; Saturday: 0930; Sunday: 0330; Monday: 1630.

Posted in accordance with Title 17, Section 107, US Code, for noncommercial, educational purposes.

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