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Hanover Prepares Mass Evacuation of 50,000 Following Discovery of 13 Buried WWII Bombs


May 7, 2017
Al Jazeera

German authorities in the town of Hanover are preparing the second-biggest mass evacuation in decades ahead of major bombs disposal operation. More than 50,000 people have been ordered to leave their homes to allow bomb squads to remove 13 WWII bombs uncovered at a construction site. Hanover was a frequent target of Allied bombing in the latter years of the war. On October 9, 1943, some 261,000 bombs were dropped on the city.

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2017/05/hanover-prepares-mass-evacuation-wwii-bombs-170506170749990.html

Hanover Prepares Mass Evacuation over WWII Bombs
Al Jazeera

HANOVER (May 6, 2017) -- More than 50,000 people have been ordered to leave their homes in the German city of Hanover ahead of a a large-scale operation to defuse unexploded bombs dating back to World War II, according to officials.

A total of 13 unexploded ordnances from the 1940s, found at a construction site, are expected to be removed from the northwestern city on Sunday. Defusing operations will start in the morning, but they can last well into the night.

The evacuation, the second-biggest since 1945, involves three heavily-populated areas of Hanover, which account for 10 percent of the city's entire population.

Early evacuations started on Friday and Saturday as residents of senior care facilities were relocated to other parts of the city.

City authorities have announced restrictions on movement for security purposes.

Trains, for example, will not stop at Hanover's main station, prompting users to engage into online dialogues with representatives of local rail services in order to plan their day.

Museums, cinemas and swimming pools have drafted special, mostly free, programmes for those evacuated.

One museum, for instance, is charging no admittance fee for the exhibition "What remains of Palmyra? Syria's destroyed heritage".



(December 25, 2016) -- Over 50,000 residents were evacuated from the southern German city of Augsburg on Sunday morning, after the discovery of an unexploded World War Two-era bomb in the city.

WWII Bombs
Such evacuations are not uncommon for Germans and construction sites seldom run without stumbling upon unexploded bombs from World War II.

German authorities are under pressure to remove unexploded ordnance from populated areas, with experts arguing that the bombs are becoming more dangerous as time goes by due to material fatigue.

Last year, the country organised its biggest evacuation to date with 54,000 people relocated in southern Augsburg.

Hanover was a frequent target of Allied bombing in the latter years of the war. On October 9, 1943, some 261,000 bombs were dropped on the city.

Some Twitter users were impressed that news of the Hanover operation had made it to New Zealand and Indonesia.

Why London Is Still Covered With WWII Bombs



Posted in accordance with Title 17, Section 107, US Code, for noncommercial, educational purposes.

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